Why A WGA Strike Cannot Be Supported

Film Production

Film Production

Howard Rodman, a WGA board member during the last strike, and now the elected president of the WGA West, is recorded in Deadline Hollywood as saying, “This is an era where the companies are doing astonishingly well – the companies’ profits have doubled in the last decade, now approaching $50 billion a year. So much of that profit originates with our work. The companies forget that.”

WGA HALF-TRUTH RHETORIC

Not true. The half-truth rhetoric from the WGA is equivalent to the Trump administration saying that there isn’t any need to address climate change. It’s a regressive attitude of a small self-interest group at the expense of the 423,000 people who are affected by a WGA strike (see the May 2016 Bureau of Statistics reference in my last blog).

“COMPANIES” ARE THE ENEMY FOR BORROWING BILLIONS

This WGA rhetoric attempts to make “companies” the enemy. Those are the same companies who are taking great risks, borrowing, and paying out billions, to create content and employ more television writers, actors and crew than have ever been employed before in the history of the industry!

Let’s take Netflix, for example. It is now in debt to the tune of $3Billion in order to create content. And that debt makes it possible to hire a record number of television writers who would otherwise be unemployed. Now before you say, “Yeah, but what about all their profits!” let’s follow the money, i.e. the cash money.

ARE THOSE SAME COMPANIES ACHIEVING CASH FLOW PROFITS?

Market Watch has this really cool chart which shows that Netflix has had a negative free cash flow for the last three years – Netflix is spending more cash than it’s getting in, in spite of huge borrowings! The mystery of accounting techniques is that, yes, it can appear that there are profits when the cash flow sucks, big time.

Let’s hope that Netflix, and the other “companies” targeted by the WGA, do reach the point of making cash profits – lots and lots of profits, so that we can all work in this great industry.

THE WGA PENSION PLANS

The final bit of rhetoric that makes my teeth grind is the complaint about the WGA’s pension plan. Apparently it will be depleted in another 3 years. When I asked a director friend of mine if the DGA suffered the same malady, he scoffed. The DGA pension is very strong! Why, I asked, would the DGA pension be strong and the WGA pension broke, when they each get an equivalent amount of funding from the producers? The only answer we could come up with is Bad Management. The WGA misused their pension funds, now want to strike for more. For those of you with children, does that sound familiar?

LEST WE FORGET – THE DIRGE OF 2007

During the 2007 strike the Milken Institute said, “The 2007 Hollywood writers’ strike dealt a blow to California’s already struggling economy and is expected to result in a loss of 37,700 jobs and $2.1 billion in lost output through the end of 2008”.

In summary,

  • The WGA writers are not the Davey Crockett’s at the Alamo. More television writers are working now than ever in the history of television.
  • The WGA records show that in 2015 TV writers earned an average annual income of $194,478. That, apparently, is not enough.
  • A WGA strike will cause significant harm to the industry.
  • The least we can do is protest.

 

Please sign the petition and pass it on to any group, or any person, that you know:

 

PETITION: I do not support a 2017 WGA strike.

 

Cheers / John

 

See my web site for current workshops on Film Accounting 101 and Film Payroll , CPE qualified http://www.filmaccounting.com

 

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About filmproduction
I have worked in the film production industry since 1985, working on over 50 different productions of every size in 6 different countries. My self-published book, "Walk The Talk" is written in an easy to read manner for film students and working professionals who haven't had the chance to learn how to 'Direct the Money'.

One Response to Why A WGA Strike Cannot Be Supported

  1. John, I agree with you 100%. I remember a WGA writers strike back in the 70’s, to hold the producers hostage. It drug on and on, finally resulting in a settlement, I don’t think they can get away with it this time. There are too many independent writers of content who can provide content on a competitive basis. And WGA’s pension problems? Right on. They are of their own making. Let ’em live with their bad decisions.

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