The Trust Barrier Facing Emerging Film Producers

BREAKING THE FINANCING BARRIER – GAINING TRUST

Once an Emerging Producer has a trusted, working script the major roadblock to overcome is financing. The concept of financing has been fraught with Ponzi schemes and false promises since money was first invented.  Is it any wonder that there is a general distrust of anyone asking for financing? … Let alone someone with little experience and  gaining the trust of investors, studio exec’s, casting directors, completion guarantors, experienced line producers, etc.

The purpose of this article is to help you break down the barriers to financing your film simply by educating you on the terms and processes taken for granted by film industry professional film producers. Watch the short video and you’ll see what I mean.

THE FILM INDUSTRY BUSINESS CYCLE

The best way I know to understand the film industry business cycle is to break it down into the basic functions of the full business cycle. The practical categories used by Producers in their everyday work are:

  • Development (Investor Confidence),
  • Green Light Stage,
  • Production Stage,
  • Post & Audit Stage and
  • The Waterfall

ONLINE COURSE – AN OVERVIEW OF THE FILM INDUSTRY

This online course takes  about 2 or 3 hours to go through, has 12 videos and a 71 page course content. I have priced this for Emerging Producers at just $39.95.

It also includes a download of a $9Mil professional budget example in pdf format.

 

 

 

For more information see  http://www.talkfilm.biz/filmbusiness.htm 

 

Cheers / John

Producer Tasks Often Overlooked – Cashflows

I recently stumbled across a Filmmaker’s Checklist by Jason Brubaker. I really liked it! Normally, those kinds of lists just annoy me; however, Jason’s list of 65 items all ring true from my 30 years of experience in production. It’s prepared for the small Indie Producer trying to emerge into this very competitive film industry. By all means check it out.

CASHFLOW OF THE PRODUCTION BUDGET

Without taking away from Jason’s excellent list, he missed one vital step – the Cashflow of the Production Budget. This schedule is KEY to arranging financing. Without it the financiers will not know how much is required on a week-to-week basis, making the financing seem like one big blob.

PREDICTION LOWERS THE RISK FOR INVESTORS

Remember, no-prediction = high-risk. Investors want you to show a week-to-week prediction of cashflow requirements FOR EVERY NUMBER IN THE BUDGET. Some of those numbers may be a guess, but it really does give the bonding company, the banks and the financiers a lot of comfort that the Producer is at least attempting to reduce the risk for the investor. See the video clip below.

CASHFLOW OF THE BUDGET WITH ALL KNOWN FUNDING

CashflowsAnother schedule which potential investor’s love to see is a match-up of all budgeted costs with the known funding – sometimes called the “Loan Analysis Schedule”. This is a schedule which matches the budgeted costs with the arrival of any and all funding, whether it be loans on Tax Credits, Equity funding, loans on any Pre-Sales in foreign territories, etc. See this video clip to see what I mean.

FILM PRODUCTION ACCOUNTANT

Yes, this might be the duties of a film production accountant; however, if you are an emerging producer you should have this task as one of your skills when raising financing early in development. Once you have the templates it really is quite easy to master.

See the following links for more information about film accounting courses and film production courses for emerging producers.

 

Cheers / John

Emerging Producers – Overview of the Film Industry

BUSINESS LANGUAGE OF PRODUCING FILMS

Emerging Producers must separate themselves from the crowd as someone who knows the “Business Language” of the investors, Major Studios, Completion Guarantors, Distributors, etc. You can’t be confused with the clutter of people who “have a great idea”, but can’t express their ideas in a business like manner.

The purpose of this article is to help you take a giant step towards your goal as a Producer, and of ultimately financing for your film.

BUSINESS CYCLE

By breaking down the business cycle of film into:

  • Development (Investor Confidence),
  • Green Light Stage,
  • Production Stage,
  • Post & Audit Stage and
  • The Waterfall

you will be able to more confidently discuss the film and television production business from a business perspective with potential investors and completion guarantors throughout North America.

ONLINE COURSE

This online course takes  about 2 or 3 hours to go through, has 12 videos and a 71 page course content. It also includes a download of a $9Mil professional budget example in pdf format.

See http://www.talkfilm.biz/filmbusiness.htm for more information.Overview-Indie

Cheers / John


John is a working film production accountant who has worked on over 50 film and television productions in 6 countries since 1985. His book, “Walk The Talk”, live workshops and online courses are highly regarded. See http://www.filmaccounting.com for more info.

Film Financing Series – Don’t Forget the Tax Credit Audit

INDIE PRODUCING – TAX CREDITS AS FINANCING

Most of us in film production have a very strong interest in the process of applying for the various State Film Tax Credits. It is a very real source of financing that can be estimated in the early stages of development, and is a big part of any Indie Producer’s job.

INDIE PRODUCING – PREPARING FOR THE CPA’S TAX CREDIT AUDIT

The Indie Producer can usually find someone to lend the production company up to 85% of the total “Estimated Tax Credit”; however, the lender will hold back at least 25% of the agreed amount (i.e. hold back 25% of the 85% financing) until the final CPA audit has been accepted by the State. The material to audit must be prepared by the film production accountant, with input from the Indie Producer, and presented to the CPA in the format required by the State. This preparation for the final audit is just as much part of producing as is arranging for the initial financing.

IT IS AN AUDIT OF THE COSTS PRESENTED IN THE “COST REPORT”

Effectively, the CPA is auditing the “Cost Report” produced by the production accountant. Additionally, the State may want the costs presented in specified templates, or in a cost report format of their own choosing. Remember that it is not up to the auditor to prepare schedules, or to find material to audit. It is up to the Producer and film accountant to present the appropriate schedules, cost report and original documents for audit. The producer who has not planned for the effort it takes to have the costs presented to the CPA will be over-paying the auditors, loan interest and delaying the final tax credit awards.

A sidebar to this blog is the audit of the Indie Producer’s relationship with the vendors, and of any economic rewards the Indie Producer may have received, even if seemingly legal. This is something that all States are vigilant about, especially Louisiana.

opinionWHAT DOES THE STATE REQUIRE TO SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETE AN AUDIT

(Note: For non-accountants, “AUP” in the picture opposite means “Agreed Upon Procedures” – these are the procedures required to be performed by the CPA before the State will accept the application for the final tax credit). See the video. Each State has its own audit procedures. Some States go so far as to audit the records themselves, without the help of a CPA. I have taken 5 States as a sample and I’ve prepared links to the appropriate schedules required by the State, as well as the audit procedures required. See http://www.talkfilm.biz/statelinks.htm

In addition I have carved up a short intro film, less than 3 minutes, from one of my online courses.

The web page and the film clip will give both Indie Film Producers and CPA’s an introduction to the process of auditing the film production’s cost report. A vital step in the financing of your Indie film.

For more information and coming workshops see my web site at http://www.filmaccounting.com

Cheers / John

Film Unions – Finding Financing or Finding Work

FINDING FILM FINANCING, OR EVEN JUST FINDING WORK

In my last article, “Finding Film Financing – Can it be Taught?” I listed several blocks of knowledge which could be taught. Having a workable understanding of such things as Union/Guild Agreements, Film Payroll, Bank Loans, Tax Credits, Production Cost Controls, etc., and how they weave together, will project you as a competent professional.

KNOWING FILM UNION AGREEMENTS ELEVATES YOUR STATUS

Does that mean that a financier will invest in your film project if you know your way around film Guild and Union Agreements (SAG, DGA, IATSE, etc)? Not necessarily. But it does mean that an experienced financier will have more confidence in your decision-making, and will have more confidence in referring you, listening to other strategies more suitable to their portfolio, etc. It definitely gives you an elevated status which the film community will pick up on. That financier might just say, “I’m looking for a young executive like you…” and start negotiating a contract to keep you on full-time.

WORD OF MOUTH IS EVERYTHING IN THE FILM COMMUNITY

The film and television production community prides itself as being much different from the rest of the business world. Word of mouth is everything. Impress one studio executive, or an experienced bond company representative, or a state tax administrator, etc. and believe me you have just made an “in” with their contacts as well. There are so many “wannabe’s” and only a few who will actually go the extra mile to learn the financial building blocks of the business of producing film and television content. Show them you’re in that small group who understand Guild and Union Agreements and their confidence in you rises sharply.

FILM PAYROLL RULES ARE LOCATED WITHIN EVERY “AGREEMENT”

The film unions and guilds have made “Agreements” with the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers, generally known as the AMPTP. The “Agreements” state the rules of the contract between the Guild or Union and the Producer, including all payroll rules.

Each Guild/Union has broken down their rules for calculating payroll into the following 4 categories:

  1. The “Basic Day” and Overtime Rules
  2. The penalties associated with “Rest Violations” (also called “Turnaround”, or “Forced Calls”).
  3. The penalties associated with violating Meal Periods (called “Meal Penalties”).
  4. The various circumstances associated with Travel – whether to a “Distant Location” (i.e. staying in a hotel), or traveling outside of a defined “Studio Zone”.

Once you know where these points are in each of the agreements your task becomes one of familiarization and practice.

THE NECESSARY TRAINING AND PRACTICE

I’ve found that a full weekend practicing the feature film payroll rules, followed up by on-line links to all the materials, is plenty for your average person to learn how to manage and to calculate the union/guild payrolls to “gross” (i.e. to the gross amount of pay due before union and government benefits/deductions). I also supply timecard templates (yes, with the formulas) which are “helpers”. Once you have a working understanding of the various Agreements you can fluidly optimize your management of any union/guild within your production.

For more information see http://www.talkfilm.biz

Cheers / John

 

Finding Film Financing – Can It Be Taught?

A friend of mine told me that he is very interested in opening a Film Financing School in Los Angeles. The school would deliver a series of comprehensive courses by industry professionals. His investors have asked him why no one else has done it before. My friend asked me how I would respond to that question. When I started to answer him, I realized that I needed to find out what others thought. Please feel free to chip in with your opinion.

FINDING FINANCING IS A GAME OF CREATING CONFIDENCE

Finding financing is primarily a game of creating confidence – this is true of any business, but especially of film financing. Those who have expendable income can afford to have professional investment advisers. Those advisers are allergic to risk – period. This is not only true of “Accredited Investors” (those who the Securities Commission have defined as being open to general solicitation of funds) but also of the Major Studios.

REDUCING RISK FOR INVESTORS

So, Film Financing is a game of reducing the risk for investors. Reducing risks CAN be taught. It just isn’t taught in film schools, and is only very rarely addressed in graduate schools. Remember that those with expendable income generally have a wide spectrum of ways to invest their funds. Film is risky; however, it is also sexy, and if a large amount of the risk is eliminated through good business practice I believe that investors will come.

CREATIVE BUSINESS PRACTICES

How do you reduce the risk? The answer could generally be split into two fields: the creative script, and creatively performing the business of film and television.

The creative script is where 90% of the effort is placed, and that’s why so few Indies make it. The writing and casting of the script is left alone here. That is something that the film schools DO know how to teach. In this blog let’s look only at the creative business practices and what it takes to reduce risks as perceived by the investor.

FILM FINANCING – WHAT IS THE BEST COURSE CONTENT

Here is where I need your help. Can you give me feedback as to what you would like to learn in order to make film financing a possibility for you? These are the categories that I feel are needed. Each of these courses/categories could be attended separately; however, it would be best in sequence. These categories are well in advance of most of what’s on the web. Please let me know how you feel about it, especially if you would rather do it online, as opposed to going to LA to attend in person :

  1. Film Budgeting and Scheduling: using Excel and/or Movie Magic applied to an actual script.
  2. State Tax Incentive estimating on at least three film friendly States (say, Georgia, Louisiana and California), utilizing the film budget and shooting schedule completed above. Once an estimation is learned, then the student must learn how to best monetize that tax credit estimate.
  3. Process “An Offer to Sell Securities”, otherwise known as Crowd Funding, applying the current rules and forms per the US Securities and Exchange Commission.
  4. Prepare Cash Flow Schedules (both cash expended and cash funding arranged/postulated) acceptable by a bank as part of a Bank Loan Process. Use the Film Budget as the basis for the cash expended and the State Tax Credits, Pre-Sales to specific territories and Equity expected as the cash funding arranged/postulated.
  5. Process a mock bank loan based on an actual loan processed to experience the range of legal and accounting documents required by the banker and the Completion Guarantor. Use the cash flows above as the basis to estimate the loan interest.
  6. An introduction to the Guilds and Unions of the film industry: What are the general rules of payment and fringe due per the rules of the Writers Guild, the Screen Actors Guild, the Director’s Guild and the IATSE crew unions. How does the residual system work and what are the budgeting and cash flow obligations which the producer must manage.
  7. Film Production Cost Control Points for both producers and accountants: The investors need to know that you have the ability to control production; otherwise the investors will cut you out of the process very early on. The only way for them to have confidence in you is if you can demonstrate an understanding of film industry specific production workflows, forms and practices, including your relationship with the Completion Guarantor through the weekly Cost Report.
  8. Final Business Plan: Bring together all of the above into a final business plan that is professional looking, scalable and defensible.
  9. Salesmanship: reenactments of pitching investors with the business plan above, pitching the script, assuring investors that you CAN control the costs during production, etc. This level is very much a practical where the student will bring together all of his/her knowledge of the line items above.
  10. Other: There are certain legal templates used to Incorporate as an LLC, to acquire Rights Ownership, to write Distribution Agreements, format Pre-Sales of Rights to Territories, Equity sweeteners, etc that can either be introduced within the subjects above, or brought into the mix after acquiring the knowledge above.

 

Each of the 9 items above would have a unique curriculum.

QUESTIONS

There is no guarantee that the Semester Credits would count towards a degree in another university. Is that important to you?

Does this comprehensive course appeal to you? Would it be better delivered in person, or online?

All for now,

Cheers / John

Crossing Over to Film Accounting – Financing

FILMACCOUNTING101DEFINING THE WEAKNESS IN FILM FINANCING – NO ACCOUNTING EXPERIENCE

An accountant is seldom used to help the Producer pitch for financing. Most emerging Producers aren’t educated in pitching to financiers who are well schooled in standard business practices – and, even if the pitching Producer has some idea that help is needed in preparing financial projections, the cost of the accountant’s services may seem prohibitive.

ACCOUNTANTS GENERALLY LACK EXPERIENCE

Even if the pitching Producer does go to his/her local CPA, it may very likely be a disappointment. Most accountants ARE weak in this unique area of film finance. Ask any CPA about investing in film production and they’ll tell you straight up – too risky! But … ask that same accountant about investing in a rental property in Bohunk, say a small medical center, and the accountant will jump in with both feet. Why? Simply because the accountant has experience in similar projects and there is an infrastructure in place to find and analyze data of a similar nature.

FINANCING FILM PROJECTS IS PIONEERING WORK

The film industry has been a closed industry. The current blast of YouTube, Netflix, etc has opened the door to the industry, but it certainly isn’t a “taped path” to success. However, there are a few steps that are proven true in current film financing projects. These steps are only a crossover from standard business accounting to film accounting. The standards are still in the pioneer stages, so be prepared for some hard won work.

FINANCING = GENERATING CONFIDENCE WITH GOOD BUSINESS STANDARDS

The weakest factor for emerging producers to overcome is to have the ability to generate a financier’s confidence – that is, to have those with disposable income (financiers of any kind) feel confident that the film project being pitched will generate a return. That financier has several investment avenues available. Indeed there are teams of professional investors knocking on their door, all with clear documentation and proven track records. Your best hope of generating that confidence is to present your facts according a business standard that the financier is familiar with.

CROSSING OVER TO FILM ACCOUNTING

Enter the accountant, or professional producer, who has crossed over to film accounting. The film accountant is familiar with five particular ways of generating confidence – all of which should be referenced in any Executive Summary and Business Plan:

  1. FILM BUDGET: A professional film budget with both a summary page and supporting detailed accounts. If this document is unfamiliar to you please click here for more information. (Note: Within the appendix of the business plan include a copy of a standard “Cost Report” so the investor can see the industry standard of reporting the costs and how they are controlled.)
  2. STATE TAX CREDIT ESTIMATE: A clear schedule estimating the State Film Tax Incentive available based on the budget. If this topic is unfamiliar to you please click here for more information.
  3. FILE FORM D WITH THE SEC (CROWD FUNDING): Show the investor that you are only looking for “Accredited Investors” by filing a “Form D” with the SEC. This is a relatively simple form which separates you from the novice who is looking for a freebie. Please read my blog on this topic to get a better understanding of what it takes to legally solicit funds broadly.
  4. CASHFLOW REQUIREMENTS: A weekly cashflow requirement schedule both in summary and in detail by account (based on the budget). Click here for more information.
  5. FINANCING CASHFLOW SCHEDULE: By preparing this schedule the investor can see that you are transparent and alert to the costs of borrowing from film friendly institutions. Click here for more information.

Including these documents in your business plan, clearly referenced in your executive summary, will raise your credibility meter significantly with any financier.

For those of you interested in getting into film accounting in a more detailed way, should visit my web site for upcoming Film Accounting 101 2 Day workshops – two coming up, one on the West Coast and one on the East Coast. See http://www.filmaccounting.com

Cheers / John

30 year veteran of over 50 film and television productions in 6 different countries.

CPA OPPORTUNITIES – NEW SEC RULES FOR FILMMAKERS

As of September 23, 2013 the SEC passed rules for the JOBS ACT allowing filmmakers to advertise their fundraising publicly (Billboards, Twitter, LinkedIn, Websites, etc). This is causing a lot of excitement within the film community. What’s scary for filmmakers, though, is the tasks of making “reasonable efforts” to ensure that investors financing the film are “accredited investors”, not to mention the filing of “Form D” with the SEC. How is this an opportunity for CPA’s?

NEW SEC LEGISLATION

General solicitation for the financing of filmmaking has been illegal until recently. In order to comply with the JOBS ACT to create small business in America, the SEC passed Rule 506 (c)  to allow general solicitation and advertising for a private placement offering. However, in a Rule 506(c) private offering all of the purchasers must be accredited investors and the issuer must take reasonable steps to determine that the purchaser is an accredited investor. The SEC amendments can be read at this link

ACCREDITED INVESTOR

The SEC has defined an “Accredited Investor” in 8 ways – see this link for a very clear, and easy to read, definition (there are 8 types)  http://www.sec.gov/answers/accred.htm . The most interesting to me is #7: “a natural person with income exceeding $200,000 in each of the two most recent years or joint income with a spouse exceeding $300,000 for those years and a reasonable expectation of the same income level in the current year”.

HERE’S WHERE THE CPA COMES IN – “REASONABLE STEPS”

The SEC makes some suggested “reasonable steps”. Here is a quote from the amendments web page published by the SEC: “Rule 506(c) sets forth a principles-based method of verification which requires an objective determination by the issuer (or those acting on its behalf) as to whether the steps taken are “reasonable” in the context of the particular facts and circumstances of each purchaser and transaction”. You can read more about the verification methods BY CLICKING HERE. A review of the last 2 years tax returns , or a review of bank statements, investments, etc will verify that status. However, accredited Investors will not be comfortable turning over this information to filmmakers directly. This is where a CPA enters the stage.

FORM D FILING WITH THE SEC – A TASK FOR THE CPA

In addition to verifying the Accredited Investor status, the filmmaker must also file a Form D with the SEC. See http://www.sec.gov/answers/formd.htm for the details of the Form D, as well as a download of the form itself. As you can see from the form, it is a relatively simple online filing – at least for a CPA. In my experience, most filmmakers would want help with the form. Again, this is an opportunity for a CPA. There are proposals to file the Form D at least 3 times: 15 days before applying exemption under Rule 506 (c), 15 days after the first investment, 30 days after the funding has been concluded and whenever a change to the solicitation materials has been made. For more info click here.

PROPOSED NEW RULES TO ENHANCE THE SEC’S ABILITY TO EVALUATE

At the time of this writing (Oct-2013) there are a few additional proposals, which you can see here http://www.sec.gov/news/press/2013/2013-124-item3.htm . The SEC does a surprisingly good job of writing their articles – they’re very easy to read. Since we’re on the topic of opportunities for the CPA, please read the proposals with an eye towards creating new business.

FINALLY, THE “BAD ACTOR” DISQUALIFICATION

Your client, the filmmaker, is also responsible to ensure that anyone participating in the fundraising does not fall under the BAD ACTOR provisions. This includes investors, investment advisers, producers or anyone else mentioned in the fundraising documentation. BAD ACTORS are individuals that have committed a crime, fraud, etc. On July 15, 2013 Morrison Foester wrote a very short, clear article about this: to see this article click here. There are simple ways to discover this information, and I would suggest that the CPA would be able to perform this discovery for the client as well as the above services.

Cheers / John

To learn more about Film Accounting and Auditing see  http://www.filmaccounting.com/filmaccounting-cpe.htm  This is definitely not the same old CPE!

My next workshop is in Orlando Oct 12th and 13th, 2013. Learn more about the workshops at http://www.filmaccounting.com

Manufacturing Desire – by Slated

Slated, my favorite online source for Indie filmmakers, has a truly spot-on article. It’s based on a talk given by Erikl Feig, president of production at Lionsgate, explaining to a WGA West audience last year how even the largest independent film studio in North America has to tap dance between two polar sets of interests.

Colin Brown, the managing editor at Slated, has written this article and is well worth the time to read – as usual his writing style is simple to follow with excellent references.

It starts out with a quote from Erikl Feig:

“Every single movie that we make has to be sold twice. First, on a pre-sale basis, to a bunch of independent foreign distributors who are worried about losing money. And second, to a consumer who wants to see something that they haven’t seen before. Trying to find the right project and the right package that can satisfy both of those moments in time, separated by eighteen months of hopefully good execution, is really, really hard.”

The article is at this link:

http://info.slated.com/the-manufacturing-of-desire/ 

To learn more about the the basics of putting together a business-like package, see more at http://www.talkfilm.biz/filmbusiness.htm

Cheers / John

Crowdfunding – Going Legal

Crowdfunding always seemed like a “wank” to me until I started to look into the new SEC Rulings from July – 2013. (They’re taking effect in mid-Sept – 2013). Really, I had the idea that Crowdfunding was an effort by a bunch of Indie wanna-be’s whining to raise funds without making the effort to understand the Business of Film.

Maybe it was a hope and a wish before, but now it’s about to go open up Indie financing in previously unknown ways.

CROWDFUNDING IS ACTUALLY AN OFFER TO SELL SECURITIES

The Crowdfunding process is actually making “an offer to sell securities”, so it falls into the sacred territory of Hedge Funds. The people who invest will own a few points in your film – the number of points will be proportional to the amount of money invested – this is the same principle as Hedge Funds, and, indeed, is regulated by the same Regulation D of the Securities Act.

THE DIRTY THIRTIES

Many moons ago, right in the middle of the “dirty thirties” following the terrible market crash in October, 1929, the US Securities & Exchange Commission passed a ruling saying that you must register every offer to sell securities. At that time they left a loop-hole – Regulation D – a list of “Rules” for small businesses who couldn’t afford all the red tape involved with this registering process. The Rules are numbered 501 through to 508, so you may see terms like “Reg D, Rule 506”, etc. The rules are meant to be protective of the integrity of non-registered sales of securities and are restrictive.

THE JOBS ACT – SECTION 181, AND NOW RULE 506 (C)

The Jobs Act, which is the legislation behind the Federal Film Tax Incentives (generally referred to as “Section 181”) encourages investment in small business by easing certain securities regulations.  As part of the general compliance with the Jobs Act, in July 2013 the SEC passed Rule 506 (c) ) to allow general solicitation and advertising for a private placement offering. However, in a Rule 506(c) private offering all of the purchasers must be accredited investors and the issuer must take reasonable steps to determine that the purchaser is an accredited investor. The SEC legislation can be downloaded by clicking here http://www.sec.gov/rules/proposed/2013/33-9416.pdf

ACCREDITED INVESTOR

The SEC has defined an “Accredited Investor” in 8 ways – see this link for a very clear, and easy to read, definition of the 8 definitions  http://www.sec.gov/answers/accred.htm .

The most interesting to me is #7: “a natural person with income exceeding $200,000 in each of the two most recent years or joint income with a spouse exceeding $300,000 for those years and a reasonable expectation of the same income level in the current year”.

WHAT DOES THAT MEAN TO THE INDIE PRODUCER?

I think an article by Carl Brown in “Slated” on July 19, 2013 says it best:

“ … even if the SEC’s final rules don’t end up inducing millions more private investors overnight into the film industry, they will still spur the need for more diligent background checks, not to mention private placement memos that are grounded in more realistic and informed financial projections. The demand for better film data and verification paperwork will increase, and so too the likelihood that this industry will win acceptance and long-term legitimacy among a wider pool of accredited investors”.

IN SUMMARY

You will see a field of investors opening up which had been blind to us all before; however, it will also raise the bar on the quality of proposals required by the Indie Producer. Yes, the creative idea will still have power, but there will be a very high expectation from “Accredited Investors” that the Indie Producer is competent to handle their money. Your challenge will be to generate that confidence by demonstrating that you understand finance.

To find out more about how to get to that point of generating confidence see this YouTube Video: http://youtu.be/tYduDZHNRhw

 

Cheers and happy prospecting / John

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